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THE ONLY THING THAT MATTERS WITH CARAT WEIGHT

THE #1 THING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT DIAMOND CARAT WEIGHT




The Only Thing That Truly Matters With Diamond Carat Weight

One thing…

MM.

(Not talking about the rapper.)

That’s all that really matters with carat weight.

Why only 1 thing?

Because carat weight is just like any weight. It’s a weight, a size, a unit of measurement.

Like people and pounds, it doesn’t matter how much you weight, it’s irrelevant. What matters is how it’s distributed. The proportions; tall and skinny, short and fat? Proportions balance everything and make it pleasing, or not, to the eye.

And with diamonds, proportions matter even more. Because these proportions are what makes the light sparkle and dance.

You see, carat weight is just a weight; .25 ct, .50 ct, 1.00 ct, but how high the crown is, how deep the pavilion (base) is, how wide the girdle is, makes all the difference in the world.

Look at these 3 diamonds below…

They are all 1 carat diamonds, but all have 3 unique body proportions:

Compare 1 Carat Diamond Proportions

Now, when we add light to these stones, you’ll see that because of their depth or width combination, the light will either come in, bounce across the base, and come back out in brilliance and fire. Or, it will leak through the pavilion and get lost.

Light Interaction With A Round Diamond

When light is leaked, the diamonds will face up dull, dark and lifeless. Not very pretty.

Ideal cut diamonds rock.

All the others; not!

Now you may say that I’m talking more about cut then carat weight, and I would tend to agree. But here’s why; they go hand in hand.

And it’s all because of millimeters.

Diamonds are measured by millimeters (from one side of the girdle to the other). And these millimeters (mm) play a huge role in the “ideal standards” of a diamond.

For instance:

A 1 carat diamond should be close to 6.5 mm across:

1 Carat Diamonds Equals 6-5mm

If the diamond is close to that width (usually they will be around that mark, very rare to ever find a diamond dead on), the rest of the proportions will be close as well.

This fact makes judging a diamond pretty easy.

The first thing you can do when looking at diamonds, is to look at the measurements of that stone. This measurement is listed on any diamond report (measured width, height and depth):

Check Diamond MM On A GIA Diamond Report

That’s your first clue.

Second, would be the actual cut grades that go along with it:

Cut Grades Of A Round Diamond

(Which is cut, polish and symmetry; a triple excellent combo is the best you can buy.)

These, along with the standard mm size, is the best way to tell if a diamond is proportioned properly, and a great diamond to buy.

All standard carat weight sizes have standard mm sizes, whether it be .25 ct, .33 ct, .50 ct, .58 ct, .75 ct, 1.00 ct or more. They all have “ideal” sizes. Strive to get as close to them as possible.

See the standard mm size chart below:

Diamond Carat Weight MM Sizes

(Print out a full PDF mm carat weight size chart HERE!)

Glancing at the mm sizes is a quick and effective way to instantly tell how your diamond presents itself.

Is it smaller than it should be? If so, the diamond will appear smaller for that carat weight (a 1 carat will look like an 80 point stone), and will be deeper, and lack luster and life.

If the diamond size is larger than the industry standards, then the diamond will look huge (1 carat will look like 1.25 carat), but it will also make that stone brittle and prone to chip more. It will also leak light and have a dark center.

This is why it’s vital to keep an eye on the mm size.

It’s a dead giveaway.

Is it ideal?

Or does it appear dim and dreary?

Whatever carat weight you buy is totally up to you (even though 1.00 carat is the “dream carat weight”). But the proportions are what matter the most. Check the mm.

Are you close?

See some “ideal” cut diamonds here at James Allen.

Cheers! :)





Jewelry Secrets Author

Author Richard Scott. Certified Diamontologist and Gemologist. 30 years of experience.

Let Richard help you choose the best diamond, the most dazzling engagement ring, and save as much money as possible. Read more about the author here. Follow Richard on social media; Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest. Contact Richard Scott here.

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